Fair Food Systems

Fair Food Systems

A complex and necessary task.

In today’s society we are increasingly disconnected from where our food comes from, how it was grown and the farmer who grew it. More and more is being asked of our landscape. It must provide food, contribute to water storage, produce energy, be a place for recreation and nature and make room for houses and infrastructure. The social, ecological, energy, climate and financial effects of our modern food system are unwearable for future generations. Thereby more and more people in Western Australia seem to agree that the way we operate our food and agricultural system has to be redesigned. Fortunately the number of initiatives is growing to break through this trend. But in spite of the good intentions and efforts of food producers, businesses, citizens, government and other organizations the impact is unfortunately too limited.  The complex, systemic character of food, agriculture and nature requires a long-term vision that goes beyond the direct interests of all players. That requires an integral approach involving all perspectives of the system taken into account and which leads to an overriding collaboration. Only then is it possible to release the old, harness untapped potential and a through everyone’s support realise a broad social transition.

On 25 September 2015, countries adopted a set of international sustainable development goals (SDG’s) to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure prosperity for all, as part of a new sustainable development agenda. An essential prerequisite to meeting these SDG’s within the 15 year target is a transition towards fair, healthy and regenerative food systems. At least nine of the SDGs will require a fundamental overhaul of our existing food and agriculture systems, while the remaining eight SDG’s are at least indirectly related to our food systems. Increasingly scientists are convinced that food in fact connects all SDGs. The world is changing and communities must take ownership of and responsibility for their future food security and management of natural resources.

The 2019 Food for Thought Festival will facilitate connectedness and cooperation between individuals, organisations, networks and places to increase our collective ability to design creative solutions and deliver positive impact across the food and agricultural system.